Fossil strata dating

This extrapolation is based on the fact that an unstable (radioactive) chemical element, called the parent isotope, breaks down at a presently known rate to form a more stable daughter isotope.In the case of radiocarbon dating, an unstable isotope of carbon (C by half every 5,730 years (the half-life).The most commonly used radiometric methods for “dating” geological specimens are potassium-argon, uranium-thorium-lead, and strontium-rubidium.All three of these decay processes have half-lives measured in billions of years.

To date a specimen by radiometric means, one must first know the starting amount of the parent isotope at the beginning of the specimen’s existence. For over 100 years, geologists have attempted to devise methods for determining the age of the earth that would be consistent with evolutionary dogma. Evolution, depending as it does on pure chance, requires an immense amount of time to stumble upon anything remotely approaching the integrated complexity we see in even the simplest living things.The most widely used method for determining the age of fossils is to date them by the “known age” of the rock strata in which they are found.On the other hand, the most widely used method for determining the age of the rock strata is to date them by the “known age” of the fossils they contain. O’Rourke, for example, concedes: The intelligent layman has long suspected circular reasoning in the use of rocks to date fossils and fossils to date rocks.

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